Loading

InfoWorld Blog Post Got It Wrong

by cbensen on July 25, 2008

Subscribe

Tags : , ...

Categories : Featured Articles




Yesterday, Paul Venezia, author of the Infoworld blog “The Deep End” wrote a post questioning whether our DNS servers were hacked. Paul writes:

“I was just hipped to the fact that two DNS servers apparently operated by Network Solutions aren’t returning valid results for some domains, notably www.google.com…”

Firstly and most importantly, we need to state that our nameservers have not been hacked, nor are our systems prone to the DNS cache poisoning flaw recently in the news.

Secondly, our nameservers are designed and intended to only be authoritative nameservers for domain names that we specifically manage for our customers. If our nameservers receive a DNS query for a domain name for which they are not authoritative, our nameservers will not recurse and will not provide accurate results.

However, this should not be an issue because our nameservers referenced in Paul’s posting should not be configured as a default (resolver) for client systems. For example, one would not configure our nameservers as the default resolvers on Paul’s “mba” system (see his examples), so authoritative only behavior shouldn’t be a problem.

Thirdly, this type of authoritative-only behavior is common practice throughout the industry. For example, query one of GoDaddy’s nameservers or one of SEDO’s nameservers and you’ll get the same result.

We respect InfoWorld and Paul, but it’s important to research and confirm the facts before simply stating an opinion. And in this case throwing the word hacked out there without proper homework seemed a little off kilter and unnecessarily causes false alarms when there is no need for them.

Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more posts like this!

Brought to you by Network Solutions®, a Web.com® service.

Related Posts

    • http://weblog.infoworld.com/venezia Paul Venezia

      …and yet, when I queried that nameserver, it returned the wrong information for http://www.google.com, a few days after the DNS bug was public. If you’re going to break the RFCs and knowingly configure your servers to return incorrect information, you have to take the good with the bad, right?

    • cbensen

      Sorry, Paul I guess every conversation does not necessarily end in agreement. But we do appreciate you pointing this out, and will continue reading your blog. Have a great day.

    • coral

      I am accessing from the UK and have been receiving a server busy notice for http://www.networkolutions.com for the past 24 hours. Surely if Network Solutions was “down” it would be big news. Have got others to check from UK and Germany all receive same error message when trying to access any pages in the Network Solutions website that start with a www
      ??

    • LBIRD

      I am accessing from the UK and have been receiving a server busy notice for http://www.networkolutions.com for the past 24 hours. Can anyone explain what is happening?

    • cbensen

      We have posted information on what the problem is. We hope to have it resolved soon. You can find more information here. http://solutionsarepower.com/2008/technical-challenges/

      Connie